Quarterly Live News

Q3 (July – September)    Captures:    North Norfolk 0    Bure 0    Yare 1    Waveny 1    Thet 0    Wissey 0    Wensum 0    Nar 0    Great Ouse 0    Little Ouse 0    |    Sightings:    Bure    –    Mink footprints on a raft at Knapton, Pigneys wood next to the Dilham Canal.    Live sighting near South Walsham.   Yare    –    Mink seen at Langley on the road that leads down to Hardley Mill.

2019 Results to Date

0
North Norfolk
0
Bure
0
Yare
0
Waveney
0
Thet
0
Wissey
0
Wensum
0
Nar
0
Great Ouse
0
Little Ouse

Some records can be late coming in and the Suffolk Wildlife Trusts numbers for the Waveney and Little Ouse will not be put in until they have their full numbers at the end of the year, these will be in our yearly updates.

2018 STATISTICS

Total Mink Caught 37
Rafts Deployed 431
Traps on Loan 435
Volunteers Involved 292

Progress: 2004 – 2018

Click image to enlarge.

The graph shows the number of mink taken per catchment each year since the Project started. Work initially focused on a few catchments but has gradually expanded to now cover the whole county. In 2018 we caught fewer mink than in any year since the project started and believe that this genuinely reflects a much smaller population of mink than before the project started. However, should control effort relax, mink will quickly become reestablished at a higher density, with proportionately greater impact on our wildlife, particularly water voles.

Fluctuations in Trapping Success

Click image to enlarge.

We are sometimes asked if mink are more easily caught at one time of year than another. The simple answer is ‘yes’ and the figure shows the relative trapping success during trapping operations. This was from one long term trapping study but the pattern holds good for our population as it is based on when mink are most mobile and therefore most likely to encounter a trap. Mink are most frequently caught in late summer, when juveniles predominate, and during the mating season, when there is a tendency to catch more adult males. Perhaps relax a bit in May and June but keep a sharp look out in the spring and autumn!